Is coffee a drug of choice?

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Is coffee a drug of choice?

Grace Haworth, Staff Writer

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Your alarm goes off, you roll out of bed, and the first thing you do is get a cup of coffee. If this describes your regular morning, then you are not alone. Coffee cups and travel mugs can be spotted daily throughout the hallways in the hands of both teachers and students.

      Some of the common conceptions of coffee range from it stunting your growth to raising your risk of heart disease. It can also make those who drink it shaky and on edge. Although the caffeine in coffee can become extremely addictive, according to Harvard School of Public Health, coffee can actually protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and even liver cancer and cirrhosis. So is drinking coffee good or not?

       Senior Jana Zeeb who regularly drinks coffee says she doesn’t always feel the need to drink it to wake up and have a normal day.

       “I can usually get through a day without coffee, although that rarely happens,” Zeeb said.

Though Zeeb does drink coffee multiple times a week, she does not feel that it has become a problem.

        Zeeb started drinking coffee around seventh grade, but started drinking it regularly her sophomore year. She also claims that the caffeine has little affect on her.

“I rarely feel the impacts,” Zeeb said.

        It can be common for coffee drinkers to experience a crash after drinking too much coffee or not enough, but Zeeb said it is not common for her to crash due to the caffeine.

“If I have coffee for a few days in a row then miss the next day, I sometimes get a headache,” Zeeb said, “but not always.”

       Junior Sophie Roper, on the other hand, has had a different experience.

“I have drank coffee for a few years, but I quit because it makes me feel jittery,” Roper said. “Caffeine can be really addictive, though, so it was hard to stop.”

       Whether or not to drink coffee really depends on how the drink affects you. Similarly to drugs, it can become addictive, but it does not affect everyone in the same way.

       “I could never give it up,” Zeeb said, “but I’m trying to drink less lattes and specialty drinks and have more brewed coffee.”

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